Irish Museum of Modern Art  

(External)

Level A conformance icon, W3C-WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0

(External) High Graphics Version  

Top Navigation 1

1.1. Home
1.2. About IMMA
1.3. Join & Support IMMA
1.4. Contact IMMA

Top Navigation 2

2.1. What's New
2.3. Join the Mailing List

Left Navigation 3

About IMMA
    Press Office
    Heritage Programme
    Events at IMMA/RHK
    Job Opportunities
    Tenders
    Child Protection Policy
    Annual Report
    Customer Charter
    Sustaining Progress
    Freedom of Information Act
    Prompt Payment Quarterly Returns
    National Development Plan
    Privacy Policy
    Terms and Conditions
    Refund Policy
    Testimonials
    Become a Member - Gold Patron

3.1. Exhibitions
3.2. Collection
3.3. Search the IMMA Collection
3.4. Education and Community
3.5. IMMA Residency Programme
3.6. National Programme
3.7. IMMA Online: New Developments
3.8. Events at IMMA/RHK

 

Page Body

About IMMA > Press Office

Record at Siamsa Tire

PRESS RELEASE – 29 October 2010

A Collaborative between the Irish Museum of Modern Art and Siamsa Tire in association with the Kerry Film Festival

Record , an exhibition of three film works from the Collection of the Irish Museum of Modern Art, opens to the public at Siamsa Tire, Tralee, Co Kerry on Saturday, 30 October 2010 .  The exhibition focus is on three different film works that represent reality in a documentary style, each shot by different artists: Sarah Morris, Gerardo Suter and Alanna O’Kelly.

Robert Towne by Sarah Morris turns the cameras on the screen writer/director Robert Towne.  It presents a ‘portrait’ of the script-doctor whose work has included many classic block-busters from the 1970s onwards.  Towne is shot portrait-style talking in his home with the occasional view of his desk or hallway.  However, against the unchanging visual content during Towne’s 34-minute monologue, Morris is able to introduce subtle allusions to cinematic techniques.  Atmospheric music suggests a building tension as Towne becomes excited about a point he is making.  With the music, later, fading out once he has finished the point.  Likewise, uncomfortable and seemingly unnecessary cuts in the film unsettle the viewer awkwardly between Townes sentences. 

Morris’s film enjoys the paradox of Towne the central character and Towne the film-maker, ‘an anarchist who wants to take control of a fantasy world.’  Ultimately, her exaggerated editorial techniques deliberately draw attention to the methods by which film-makers construct a picture of reality. 

Gerardo Suter, who directs Replica, uses five seconds of footage of one of the first images broadcast on the day of the 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, the most devastating in the history of the Americas.  While the footage is rolling, Suter runs text along the bottom of the screen written by Carlos Monsivais recounting his own experience of the tragedy.  Monsivais is a cultural historian, known for his chronicles of life in Mexico and specifically its capital city.  Both he and Suter have focused much of their work on the history and culture of Mexico.

The film is a visual and intellectual perception of extreme moments that, under special circumstances, become minutes, hours or days.  As a result of the earthquake, according to official government statistics, more than 9000 people were killed, 30,000 injured and 100,000 left homeless; 416 buildings were destroyed and over 3,000 seriously damaged.

The third film by Alanna O’Kelly is Sanctuary/Wasteland which presents a rocky burial mound onto which O’Kelly has projected a slow-moving vocabulary of film close-ups illustrating evidence of burials and the long-term effects of the famine on the life of the area Thallabhawn, Co Mayo.

Teampall Dumhach Mhór or ‘Church of the Great Sandbank’ lies on the edge of an estuary between Mweelrea Mountain and the Atlantic Ocean in Thallabhawn.  Against the backdrop of this rocky mound, O’Kelly superimposes details of the original site.  The undercurrent of sombre sound is an integral element within the film work.  Sounds of breathing, of keening – the traditional lament for the dead in the west of Ireland – and sounds from the wider world, where similar famines continue to occur, complete the piece.  The overall effect of sight and sound serves to convey the famine’s emotional extremes – hope and despair, loss and recovery.

All three films that make up the exhibition Record will be shown in Siamsa Tire as part of the Kerry Film Festival for 2010.  It is a collaborative project between the National Programme at IMMA and the Gallery at Siamsa Tire in association with the Kerry Film Festival.

The central aim of the Museum’s National Programme is to establish the Museum’s core values of excellence, inclusiveness and accessibility to contemporary art on the national level.  Focusing on the Collection from the Museum, the programme facilitates offsite projects and exhibitions in a range of venues and situations throughout Ireland.  IMMA aims to act as a resource at a local level through working in partnership, relying on the knowledge and concerns of the local community.  Partner organisations are wide-ranging and include a variety of venues both in traditional art and non-arts spaces, allowing for far-reaching access and interaction.

The exhibition continues until 19 November 2010 in Siamsa Tire.

Siamsa Tíre Theatre
Town Park, Co Kerry, Ireland
t +353 (0)66 7123055    
f +353 (0)667127276     
e info@siamsatire.com
w (External) www.siamsatire.com

The Kerry Film Festival
The Windmill, Blennerville, Tralee, Co. Kerry
t +353 66 712 9934
f +353 66 712 0934
e info@samhlaiocht.com
w (External) www.kerryfilmfestival.com

For further information please contact Patrice Molloy or Vanessa Cowley at Tel : +353 1 612 9900, Email : press@imma.ie  

Downloadable Version (Word Doc 2003, 35KB)

 

Footer Navigation 4

4.1. Press Office
4.2. Corporate Events
4.3. Customer Charter
4.4. Sitemap
4.5. Print Version

 

Change Text Only Settings

Graphic version of this page